KICK BUTTS DAY HIGHLIGHTS THE ROLE OF HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS IN DECREASING RATES OF YOUTH TOBACCO USE

Health Care Organizations Should Integrate Tobacco Screening and Treatment into Adolescent Standard Clinical Care to Assist the Nearly 25 Percent of All High School Seniors that Currently Use Tobacco.1

New York, NY – This Wednesday March 16th marks the 10th anniversary of Kick Butts Day — a national day of activism focused on educating youth about the dangers of tobacco use and encouraging youth to stand up to Big Tobacco. Hosted by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Kick Butts Day encourages youth to reject tobacco industry’s targeted youth marketing and supports proven strategies to prevent youth tobacco use, which includes: advocating for higher tobacco taxes, applying smoke-free laws, and implementing prevention and cessation programs. 

According to a 2015 publication released by the American Academy of Pediatrics, youth still are disproportionately impacted by tobacco use, with more than 3.6 million current youth tobacco users in the US.2  Of those current users, more than 80 percent will continue using tobacco as adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, if tobacco use among youth continues at current rates, 5.6 million of Americans currently under 18 years will die prematurely from tobacco-related illnesses.3 Youth with low socioeconomic status (SES) have a higher prevalence of tobacco use than youth with higher SES - a variance that contributes to persistent disparities in health outcomes in adulthood.4

The Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement for a Tobacco-Free New York (COE for HSI) encourages health care providers to screen and provide tobacco dependence treatment to all New Yorkers, including adolescents, by integrating tobacco cessation treatment into standard clinical care. The COE for HSI supports this effort by working with ten regional contractors across New York State to implement policy and systems changes in health care organizations that serve populations that use tobacco at disparate rates by integrating evidence-based best practices for tobacco dependence treatment into routine care. Health care organizations have an opportunity to help individuals, including youth, gain access to tobacco dependence treatment to decrease tobacco use rates in New York State. “We strongly encourage health care organizations to use Kick Butts Day as a day of action to make tobacco cessation among adolescents a priority,” said Marcy Hager, Project Director of COE for HSI. “This effort will ensure that another generation does not have to suffer the high consequences of tobacco use on their generation’s overall health.”

To learn more about Kick Butts Day activities across New York, visit www.kickbuttsday.org

For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.


1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015, October 14). Youth and Tobacco Use. Retrieved from www.cdc.govhttp://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/youth_data/tobacco_use/
2.  American Academy of Pediatrics, Julius B. Richmond Center of Excellence Tobacco Consortium. (2015, April) State-of-the-Art Office-Based Interventions to Eliminate Youth Tobacco Use: The Past Decade. Pediatrics, Volume 135/Issue 4.
3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention.
4. Tobacco Control Legal Consortium (2012). Cause and Effect: Tobacco Marketing Increases Youth Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the 2012 Surgeon General's Report. St. Paul, MN: Tobacco Control Legal Consortium.


About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For more than 35 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in more than 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering more than 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 regional contractors throughout New York State working with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low incomes, less than a high school diploma, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

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NEW YORK TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM HEADS TO ALBANY TO HELP SAVE LIVES AND MONEY

In New York, more than 28,000 adults die annually from smoking related diseases

New York, NY – This week, more than 30 tobacco control programs from across the state will head to Albany to meet with lawmakers about the deadly impact of tobacco use on New York’s most vulnerable populations. Killing more than 28,000 New Yorkers every year, tobacco use continues to be the #1 preventable cause of death in the United States. At the annual Legislative Day on Tuesday, February 9, programs will educate legislators on the necessity of New York’s Tobacco Control Program. Among them will be CAI’s Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement for a Tobacco-Free New York, which will focus on the importance of promoting large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services.

Although tobacco use has declined in recent years among the general population, data indicates significant disparities in tobacco use prevalence among those New York adults with less than a high school education, low incomes, and serious mental illness—populations that continue to use tobacco at rates well above the general population. The mission of comprehensive tobacco control programs is to reduce the health disparities that tobacco use causes by establishing infrastructure and building capacity regionally, and to reduce barriers to individuals seeking treatment and promote tobacco-free environments. 

 “The COE for HSI and ten regional contractors are working to decrease the disparities in tobacco use prevalence by promoting the integration of evidence-based tobacco dependence screening and treatment into routine care within medical and behavioral health care organizations,” said Marcy Hager, Project Director of the Center of Excellence for Health System Improvement. “Although there has been significant progress in decreasing tobacco rates in the general population, work to ensure that disparate populations have access to tobacco dependence treatment and resources is essential in continuing to see overall declines in tobacco prevalence in New York.”

 Led by Hager, the New York State Department of Health Bureau of Tobacco Control-funded program will participate in the day’s activities by meeting with elected officials to explain the importance of supporting health systems improvements related to tobacco dependence treatment within health care organizations. Such improvements will ensure that every patient is screened for tobacco use, and all tobacco users are offered evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment on a regular basis. New York State legislators are invited to visit Conference Room C of the Empire State Plaza Concourse at 2:00 p.m., where representatives of Advancing Tobacco-Free Communities (Community Engagement and Reality Check) and Health Systems for a Tobacco-Free New York will be joined by volunteer youth leaders to answer questions and offer resources about effective tobacco control programs being delivered across the state. 

 For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.


1. The Toll of Tobacco in New York; Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids; Updated September 25, 2015.http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/facts_issues/toll_us/new_york
2. Bureau of Tobacco Control StatShot, Vol. 8, No. 2/Feb 2015, based on New York State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2013.
3. Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs, 2014, Section A: State and Community Interventions, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/best_practices/pdfs/2014/comprehensive.pdf

 

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For more than 35 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in more than 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering more than 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 regional contractors throughout New York State working with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low incomes, less than a high school diploma, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

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NEW CDC CAMPAIGN HIGHLIGHTS IMPACT OF TOBACCO USE ON INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS

Americans with serious mental illness are 70 percent more likely to be tobacco users

New York, NY - Earlier this week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched their 5th annual “Tips From Former Smokers” campaign aimed at highlighting the harmful effects of tobacco use and the proven health benefits of quitting. The campaign, which runs from January to June 2016, will be disseminated nationwide through a range of print, online, and television media outlets. The compelling new ads features five personal stories from former tobacco users, including Rebecca, a Florida grandmother who began smoking cigarettes at 16. A tobacco user for 37 years, Rebecca finally quit smoking after suffering from depression and tooth loss. 

Depression remains one of the most common mental illnesses in the U.S., effecting nearly 7 percent of all Americans.1 On average, tobacco use rates are estimated to be 70 percent higher among adults with mental illness compared to the general population, with significantly higher rates of tobacco use among individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia (59 percent) and bipolar disorder (46 percent).2 Despite some misconceptions among medical and mental health providers around the ability and willingness of patients with mental illness to quit tobacco use, individuals with mental illness are just as likely to successfully quit using evidence-based cessation treatments as the general population, although intensive and longer treatment sometimes is required.3

In New York State, several efforts are underway to address the issue of tobacco use among individuals with mental illness. In partnership with 10 regional contractors across the State, the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York is supporting the implementation of systems improvements at health care organizations, including mental health treatment facilities. This effort aims to engage and collaborate with health care organizations to implement systems that assure every patient is screened for tobacco use and receives evidence-based tobacco dependence counseling and treatment, if desired, as part of the standard care delivery.

“The harmful effects of tobacco use on individuals with mental illness will only decrease by ensuring the evidence-based best practices for tobacco dependence screening and treatment are implemented into standard delivery of care in mental health treatment facilities,” said Marcy Hager, Project Director of the COE for HSI.

Cigarette smoking remains the single largest cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, killing more than 480,000 Americans each year. Nearly 45 percent, or 200,000, of those deaths are among individuals with serious mental illness.4

Tobacco users interested in quitting are encouraged to talk to their health care provider or visit www.cdc.gov/tipsto view the personal stories from the CDC campaign.

For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.


1 NeCenter for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2015). Behavioral health trends in the United States: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. SMA 15-4927, NSDUH Series H-50). Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/.

2
 Mcclave, A. K., Mcknight-Eily, L. R., Davis, S. P., & Dube, S. R. (2010). Smoking Characteristics of Adults With Selected Lifetime Mental Illnesses: Results From the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Am J Public Health American Journal of Public Health, 100(12), 2464-2472.

3 Schroader, SA, Morris CD. Confronting a neglected epidemic: tobacco cessation for persons with mental illness and substance abuse problems. Annual Review of Public Health, 2010; 31:297-314.

4 Bandiera F.C., Anteneh, B., Le, T., Delucchi, K., Guydish, J.  (2015) Tobacco-Related Mortality among Persons with Mental Health and Substance Abuse Problems. PLoS ONE 10(3): e0120581. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0120581.

 

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 37 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in more than 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering more than 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 regional contractors throughout New York State working with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low incomes, less than a high school diploma, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org

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CAI Appoints Staff to Teen Pregnancy Prevention Project in Buffalo

New York, NY– CAI, a non-profit organization with an office in the Thomas R. Beecher, Jr. Innovation Center on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, has named Stan Martin project director and Maisha Drayton deputy director for community mobilization and capacity building for an initiative to develop, implement and evaluate a community-driven process to reduce teen pregnancy in Buffalo.

Stan Martin is a Buffalo native and has served as a project director and senior trainer at CAI since 2011. Mr. Martin attended Buffalo Public Schools and graduated from Seneca Vocational High School. Prior to joining CAI, he worked internationally in Toronto, Ontario on Smoke Free Ontario and as the Western Region Area Manager for the New York State Department of Health Tobacco Control Program. He has over a decade of experience in developing, planning and implementing population based strategies that impact the lives of children, adults, communities and whole populations. Mr. Martin has a master’s in management and received his B.A. in liberal studies from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Maisha Drayton of Buffalo has worked in public health for over a decade and joined CAI in December 2015. Prior to joining CAI, Ms. Drayton worked for Evergreen Health Services as Senior Director of Staff Development She is a member of Buffalo Business First’s “40 under 40” class of 2014, president of the Board of Directors of Buffalo ReformED, and a member of the Buffalo Public Schools’ Sexual Health Committee. Ms. Drayton is a graduate of SUNY Buffalo with a B.S. in broadcasting and an M.S. in creative studies.

CAI is a New York State-based nonprofit, dedicated to improving the health and well-being of communities throughout New York State, the nation and the world. CAI is pleased to be partnering with the Erie County Department of Health and the University of Buffalo Primary Care Research Institute to anchor the initiative. The grant is one of 58 community-based teen pregnancy prevention initiatives funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Adolescent Health (OAH). To learn more about program grantees and this initiative. Please visit http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/oah-initiatives/tpp_program/cohorts-2015-2020.html 

About CAI: CAI is a New York State-based nonprofit, with staff in New York City, Albany and Buffalo, dedicated to improving the health and well-being of communities throughout New York State, the nation and the world. For more than 36 years CAI has provided customized services and training to health and human services organizations, many in New York State, addressing the toughest issues in public health including HIV/AIDS, teen pregnancy, family planning, mental health, tobacco control and the nutrition of women and children. Our work in the Buffalo area has included projects with WIC, The AIDS Institute of New York State, the New York State Bureau of Tobacco Control and the Office of Health Insurance Programs. For more information about CAI and this initiative, please contact:

Stan Martin, MM
Director / Senior Trainer
505 Eighth Avenue, Suite 1900
New York, NY 10018
212-594-7741 EXT. 233
Fax: 212.629.3321
smartin@caiglobal.org

Maisha Drayton, MS 
Deputy Director, Community Mobilization and Capacity Building
640 Ellicott St, Suite 476
Buffalo, NY 14203
Phone: 716.566.2329
mdrayton@caiglobal.org

Photos of Mr. Martin and Ms. Drayton available upon request.

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CAI AWARDS MORE THAN $2.5 MILLION TO 56 NONPROFITS

Grants to provide Mammograms and Clinical Breast Exams to Underserved Women

New York, NY – CAI, in partnership with the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade, has awarded grants totaling more than $2.5 million to 56 nonprofit agencies in 33 states and the District of Columbia.  These grants will provide breast health screening to medically underserved women.  The grants are part of the Avon Breast Health Outreach Program (Avon BHOP) administered by CAI, with a mission to link medically underserved women to breast health education and screening services, particularly low-income, under-insured, and other marginalized populations who often need targeted, customized approaches to help them obtain regular mammograms and clinical breast exams.

"This program saves women’s lives by providing critically needed mammography screening and breast health education to women,” said CAI's President and Founder, Barbara Cicatelli. "Since 2000, through CAI, Avon BHOP has awarded nearly $74 million through 1,700 competitive grants to community-based agencies throughout the U.S."

CAI administers a rigorous application and independent review process to select grant recipients, who in turn have made a major impact on the lives of underserved women who are in need of breast cancer screening services. Breast screening rates are significantly lower among women with lower incomes, less education and those with no health insurance.1

Through 2014, Avon BHOP grantees facilitated more than 2.3 million mammograms and breast examinations and educated more than 15 million people on breast cancer awareness.

Among the recipients for 2016 are six new grantees including:

  • Breast Care for Washington, Washington, DC
  • Alachua County Organization for Rural Needs Inc., Brooker, FL
  • Foundation for Annie Jeffrey, Osceola, NE
  • Korean Community Services of Metropolitan New York Inc., Flushing, NY
  • YWCA of Greater Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Julie Rogers “Gift of Life” Program, Beaumont, TX

Avon BHOP is funded by the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade.  To learn more about CAI’s Avon BHOP project, visit here.

2016 Grants Awarded include:

Grantee Organization, City, State 2016 AVON BHOP Grant
Southcentral Foundation, Anchorage, AK                 $55,000
Family Services Center of Coffee County, Inc., Enterprise, AL $50,000
Encore for Women’s Health, Little Rock, AR $45,375
Tucson Medical Center, Tucson, AZ $26,000
Samaritan House, San Mateo, CA $30,000
Vista Community Clinic, Vista, CA $50,000
YWCA of North Orange County, Fullerton, CA $80,000
La Clinica Tepeyac Inc., Denver, CO $43,982
Witness Project of Connecticut Inc., Bridgeport, CT        $45,000
Breast Care for Washington, Washington, DC $55,000
Christiana Care Health Services Inc., Newark, DE $50,000
Alachua County Organization for Rural Needs, Inc., Brooker, FL $27,000
Morton Plant Mease Health Care Inc., Saint Petersburg, FL $50,000
Center for Pan Asian Community Services Inc., Atlanta, GA $40,000
Xilin Association, Naperville, IL $30,000
Southern Illinois Healthcare Foundation Inc., Sauget, IL $38,000
YWCA of Greater Lafayette, Lafayette, IN $50,000
United Methodist Western Kansas, Garden City, KS $30,000
Martin Luther King Health Center, Shreveport, LA $30,000
YWCA Of Greater Baton Rouge, Baton Rouge, LA $65,000
YWCA of Southeastern Massachusetts, New Bedford, MA $50,000
YWCA Of Malden, Malden, MA $59,000
YMCA Bangor/Caring Connections, Bangor, ME $21,000
Catherine’s Health Center, Grand Rapids, MI $26,300
Cherry Street Services Inc., Grand Rapids, MI $50,000
Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services Access, Dearborn, MI $60,000
Breakfast Club Inc., Florissant, MO $35,000
YWCA St. Joseph’s, Saint Joseph, MO $35,000
Fannie Lou Hamer Cancer Foundation, Ruleville, MS $50,000
Partnership Health Center Inc., Missoula, MT $45,000
Rural Health Group Inc., Roanoke Rapids, NC $45,000
Foundation for Annie Jeffrey, Osceola, NE $27,500
Northwest New Jersey Community Action Program Inc., Phillipsburg, NJ $25,000
Cooper Health Systems, Camden, NJ $45,000
Saint Michael’s Medical Center Inc., Newark, NJ $50,000
Korean Community Services of Metropolitan New York Inc., Flushing, NY $30,000
Project Renewal Inc., New York, NY $55,000
Charles B. Wang Community Health Center Inc., New York, NY $60,000
Chenango Health Network Inc., Norwich, NY $60,000
YWCA of Binghamton and Broome County, Binghamton, NY $65,500
YWCA of Greater Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH $44,620
YWCA of Greater Toledo, Toledo, OH $51,000
Latino Community Development Agency Inc., Oklahoma City, OK $40,000
YWCA of Northern Rhode Island, Woonsocket, RI $65,000
Volunteers in Medicine Clinic, Hilton Head Island, SC $40,160
Cancer & Chronic Disease Consortium, El Paso, TX $40,000
YWCA of San Antonio, San Antonio, TX $42,000
Julie Rogers “Gift of Life” Program, Beaumont, TX $45,000
Asian American Health Coalition of the Greater Houston Area, Houston, TX $50,000
YWCA of Lubbock Texas Inc., Lubbock, TX $50,000
Alliance Community Services, Salt Lake City, UT $60,000
Vietnamese Resettlement Association Inc., Falls Church, VA $35,000
Arlington Free Clinic Inc., Arlington, VA $39,000
Nueva Vida Inc., Alexandria, VA $50,000
Center for Multicultural Health, Seattle, WA $30,580
West Virginia Health Right Inc., Charleston, WV $50,000

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 36 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in more than 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering more than 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About Avon Foundation for Women:  The Avon Foundation for Women, the world’s largest corporate-affiliated philanthropy focused on issues that matter most to women, was founded in 1955 to improve the lives of women. Through 2014, Avon global philanthropy has donated nearly $1 billion in more than 50 countries for causes most important to women. Today, Avon philanthropy focuses its funding on breast cancer research and access to care through the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade, and efforts to reduce domestic and gender violence through its Speak Out Against Domestic Violence program. 


American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention & Early Detection Facts & Figures, 2015-2016, http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@research/documents/webcontent/acspc-045101.pdf

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