Tablets Revolutionizing Healthcare Data Collection and Improving Quality of Breast Cancer Screenings for Women

Research finds mobile devices improve efficiency, quality and completeness of clinical information

(New York, NY) -- New research on patients' utilization of tablets to provide important demographic and healthcare information confirms that mobile devices greatly improve patient data, which in turn results in improved screening and treatment for women. Using data collected from women obtaining breast health education and outreach services across 21 states, this research was presented last week at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, a conference that brings together the leading breast health physicians and researchers in the world.

The research, conducted by CAI of New York, NY on behalf of the Avon Foundation for Women Breast Health Outreach Program (Avon BHOP) found that transitioning away from paper-based surveys to tablet-based versions reduced the amount of missing information, increased patient response rates, and reduced survey completion time for the patient. The research has numerous benefits for healthcare providers as well, including reduction of data entry errors and cost associated with data entering.

"Collection of patient information through tablets could quickly become the standard in healthcare settings once providers realize the myriad of data quality and cost benefits" said Lindsay Senter, lead researcher and Director of Research and Evaluation at CAI. "Tablets are also well received among patients. Patients feel that entering personal information on tablets is more private and confidential than doing so on paper. This results in higher data quality and increased opportunities for better health outcomes."

The findings are based on a study of Avon BHOP clients who represent a low-income and highly diverse patient population in the U.S. More than 8,000 health intake forms were analyzed from March to December 2013, and 84 percent of the forms submitted on tablets had complete information compared to just 47 percent on paper.

According to the researchers, given the significantly lower rates of missing data when tablets are used, and the relatively low implementation cost, there are important implications for healthcare organizations to adopt and utilize electronic tablet-based collection of patient health data.

Additional information about the Avon Breast Health Outreach Program can be found at www.avonbhop.org.

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 35 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in over 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1,500 training programs annually, CAI's passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About Avon BHOP: The Avon Breast Health Outreach Program (BHOP) supports community-based organizations nationwide to provide education, outreach and navigation services for breast cancer screening and treatment to underserved women. Since 2000, CAI has provided capacity building services to these organizations, awarding over $74 million through more than 1700 grants to community-based agencies nationwide. Through 2013, Avon BHOP grantees facilitated more than 1.3 million mammograms and breast examinations nationwide and educated over 12 million people on breast cancer awareness. Avon BHOP is funded by the Avon Foundation for Women. For more information, visit www.avonbhop.org.

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Critical Need in U.S. to Improve Prevention & Treatment of HIV/AIDS Among Key Affected Populations

New Nationwide Effort Funded by CDC Offers Free Services to Healthcare Organizations and Clinicians

(New York, NY) As the international HIV/AIDS community commemorates World AIDS Day today, there remains a critical need to improve treatment and prevention efforts of HIV/AIDS across the U.S. Focused on achieving the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, CAI's HIV/AIDS capacity building projects aim to reduce HIV incidence, increase access to care, and optimize health outcomes among key populations.

In the U.S., more than 1.2 million people are currently living with HIV infection and gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) remain the most seriously affected by HIV. To help healthcare providers improve detection, linkage and retention efforts among key affected populations, CAI's CBA Center offers free training, technical assistance and web-based resources to healthcare organizations nationwide. Designed to support the implementation of High-Impact HIV Prevention -- scalable, scientifically proven approaches tailored to specific populations--the Center supports nationwide efforts to decrease new infection rates by 25 percent.

“Our goal is to provide tailored, data-driven services that help organizations improve their prevention efforts with individuals who are both HIV negative and HIV positive," said Dr. Robert Cohen, CAI's Medical Director. "By implementing behavioral, structural and/or biomedical interventions, including pre and post-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP and PEP) and ensuring HIV Continuum of Care standards are met, we believe we can make significant progress towards ending this epidemic."

According to researchers at New York University, the services being offered by the CBA Center come at a critical time in HIV prevention and aid in increasing access to care and new technologies now available, particularly in states with the highest rates of HIV infection.

"The efforts of CAI to work with healthcare providers to maximize the effectiveness of technologies like PrEp and PEP is both timely and important," said Dr. Perry Halkitis, Director of the Center for Health, Identity, Behavior & Prevention Studies (CHIBPS) at New York University.

Dr. Perry, who is currently conducting a study of young sexually active minority men, has found that an estimated 25percent of young gay and bisexual men in their early 20s have no awareness of PrEP, and of those that do only some 4 percent have used PrEP.

With funding from the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the CBA Center is led by Dr. Tony Jimenez. Organizations interested in requesting services or accessing online resources can visit www.hivcbacenter.org.

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 35 years, CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in over 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.


25 U.S. Cities with Highest Rates of HIV Infection

1. Miami, FL
2. New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA
3. Jackson, MS
4. Baton Rouge, LA
5. Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA
6. Washington, DC (includes VA, MD and WV suburbs)
7. Memphis, TN
8. Baltimore-Towson, MD
9. Orlando, FL
10. New York City, NY (includes NY, NJ and PA suburbs)
11. Houston-Baytown-Sugar Land, TX
12. Dallas, TX
13. Jacksonville, FL
14. Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC, SC
15. Columbia, SC
16. Los Angeles, CA
17. San Juan-Caguas-Guaynabo, Puerto Rico
18. Birmingham-Hoover, AL
19. San Antonio, TX
20. San Francisco, CA
21. Greensboro-High Point, NC
22. Austin-Round Rock, TX
23. Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL
24. Richmond, VA
25. San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/HSSR_MSA_2013_REVISED-PDF04.pdf

 

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New Program Designed to Help Healthcare Teams Improve Birth Outcomes and Reduce Unintended Pregnancy Now Accepting Applications

Latest Science Finds LARC Most Effective, But Underutilized Contraception[1]

(New York, NY) In the U.S. approximately 50 percent of all pregnancies are unintended.[2] While unintended pregnancy and closely-spaced births have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, current research suggests that highly effective forms of contraception, like IUDs and Implants, leads to a reduction in unintended pregnancies and improved birth outcomes.[3,4,5]

CAI, a leading training and capacity building organization, has teamed up with the Contraceptive CHOICE Project at Washington University in St. Louis (CHOICE) to create the "Contraceptive Action Plan" (CAP), with funding support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Providing healthcare teams with practical, user-friendly tools and web-based training, the CAP offers healthcare organizations an opportunity to help increase client access to the most effective forms of contraception, including IUDs and implants, within their community.

From November 12, 2014 to December 10, 2014, CAI and CHOICE are seeking applications from highly motivated Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) to participate in the nine month CAP Pilot Program.

The Program, which begins in early 2015, translates the research findings from a four year study of over 9,000 young women who were provided no-cost contraception in an effort to reduce rates of unintended pregnancies. After receiving standardized, contraceptive counseling about all reversible contraceptive options, including their effectiveness, advantages, and disadvantages, 73 percent of women chose a LARC method (IUD or subdermal implant).[6]

Open to healthcare teams nationwide, participating organizations will have access to free professional development and training for all staff levels including continuing medical and nursing education (CME/CNE) credits.To learn more about the CAP, program eligibility, and participation stipends, visit www.contraceptiveactionplan.org.

 

[2] http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6205a1.htm
[3] A. Chandra, G.M. Martinez, W.D. Mosher et al., “Fertility, Family Planning, and Reproductive Health of U.S. Women: Data from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth,” Vital and Health Statistics 23, Dec. 2005 (25):1-174
[4] J. Chor, K. Rankin, B. Harwood et al., “Unintended Pregnancy and Postpartum Contraceptive Use in Women With and Without Chronic Medical Disease Who Experienced a Live Birth,” Contraception, July 2011:84(1)57-63
[5
] M. Whiteman, K. Curtis, S. Hillis et al., “contraceptive Use Among Postpartum Women – 12 States and New York City, 2004-2006, “Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Aug. 7, 2009 58(30):821-26
[6] O’Neil-Callahan M, Peipert JF, Zhao Q, Madden T, Secura G. Twenty-four-month continuation of reversible contraception.Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2013;0:1-9.

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 35 years, CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in over 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1,500 training programs annually, CAI's passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

 

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New Focus within High Impact HIV Prevention Targets Healthcare Organizations as Key to Reducing New HIV Infections

CAI Selected as National Capacity Building Assistance Provider to Support Healthcare Organizations Working to Decrease HIV Infection Rates and Increase Early Detection

(New York, NY) As part of an effort to decrease the estimated 50,000 new HIV infections that occur each year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has selected Cicatelli Associates Inc. (CAI) to serve as a Capacity Building Assistance provider to healthcare organizations nationwide.[i]

The CDC's effort concentrates on strengthening the capacity of the HIV prevention workforce to implement High Impact HIV Prevention interventions-- scalable, scientifically proven approaches tailored to specific populations-- with a new focus on treatment as a critical component of prevention. This strategy highlights the significant role healthcare organizations must play in decreasing new infection rates in the US by 25%. CAI's project aims to increase early detection, linkage to and retention in care, and treatment for those living with HIV.

"Although our ability to treat HIV has progressed dramatically, only 25% of infected men, women, and children are receiving the care they need to effectively treat their infection and prevent its spread," said Dr. Robert Cohen, CAI's Medical Director. "Focusing on the important role that healthcare organizations play in lowering the transmission rate and ensuring those who are HIV positive stay in care is essential. As a capacity building organization, we are excited to support the implementation of evidence-based High Impact Prevention strategies in diverse healthcare settings."

To assist with the implementation of High Impact HIV Prevention within healthcare organizations, CAI has assembled a team with extensive treatment and prevention expertise that includes the Black AIDS Institute (BAI), the Clinical Directors Network (CDN), the National Coalition of STD Directors (NCSD), the Ruth M. Rothstein CORE Center, and the National Alliance for HIV Education and Workforce Development (NAHEWD). CAI has also included a national network of healthcare faculty that have pioneered effective implementation of High Impact Prevention and have particular experience working with young black men (ages 18-29), which is the only population that has seen a significant increase in HIV between 2006 and 2010.[ii]

"The Black AIDS Institute is proud to partner with CAI on this project," stated Phill Wilson, Executive Director of the BAI. "We are confident that CAI and the other members of the team assembled by CAI will work very hard towards an AIDS-Free Generation. We are also painfully aware that our efforts alone will not get the job done. We are never going to end the AIDS epidemic in America unless and until we build systems in care delivery and capacity building that reflect the diverse demographics of the epidemic."

In a February 2014 report, the CDC released a new study that indicates black individuals in the US continue to be the most affected by HIV. Compared with other groups, rates of new infection remain highest in this segment of the population at 44%, with an estimated 506,800 currently living with HIV in the United States.[iii]

"We are very pleased to be awarded this grant from the CDC to help healthcare organizations implement High Impact Prevention strategies," said Barbara Cicatelli, CAI's President and Founder. "We, along with a number of our colleagues, including the National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC) and the BAI, are concerned that no black-led organization was selected as a lead recipient in this new capacity building grant cycle. We believe it will be particularly important for CAI, working with black-led organizations, to assist healthcare organizations as they engage, treat, and retain in care the growing number of black individuals diagnosed with HIV. Given the disproportionate impact of HIV within the black community, CAI will make every effort to collaborate with all organizations who have long paved the way in establishing bridges between healthcare organizations and at-risk communities."

The CDC estimates that 1.1 million people in the US are currently living with HIV, including 180,900 (15.8%) of individuals who are unaware of their infection.[iv]

CAI's project, which is funded by the CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Capacity Building Branch, will be led by Dr. Tony Jimenez, CAI Vice President and Project Director. To learn more about the project, click here.

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 35 years, CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in over 23 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1,500 training programs annually, CAI's passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world.

[i] http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/docs/2012/HIV-Infections-2007-2010.pdf.

[ii] Prejean J, Song R, Hernandez A, et al. Estimated HIV Incidence in the United States, 2006-2009. PLoS ONE 2011;6(8):e17502

[iii] CDC. Progress Along the Continuum of HIV Care Among Blacks with Diagnosed HIV— United States. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2014;65(No.5). Published February, 2014

[iv] CDC. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 U.S. dependent areas—2011. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2013;18(No. 5). Published October 2013

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Great American Smokeout Spotlights Pressing Need to Offer Cessation Resources to Every Tobacco User

New York State Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement Launched to Create Crucial High-Level Systems Change to Address Tobacco Dependence

(New York, NY) The Great American Smokeout annually reminds us that quitting smoking is essential for good health, but most underserved populations in New York have not been able to quit. As part of an effort to decrease the nearly 28,000 deaths from tobacco use annually in New York State, CAI has recently launched the New York State Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement. i Focused on systems change and policy-level work that facilitates tobacco use identification and treatment among underserved populations, CAI will support 10 contractors throughout New York State and work in partnership with key stakeholders, regional health care systems, and the New York State Department of Health Bureau of Tobacco Control.

The Center of Excellence will build on CAI's expertise in population-based tobacco control efforts to reduce the prevalence of adult smoking, especially among individuals with low incomes and serious mental illness. Research has shown that these key populations have significantly higher smoking rates as compared to the general public and less access to regular counseling and treatment.

"We know tobacco isn't an equal opportunity killer -- there has been almost no reduction in smoking rates in certain populations," said Michelle Gerka, CAI's Vice President of Community Heath Programs. "We are eager to work with large health systems on a targeted strategy to reach those populations who have not been able to successfully quit in New York State."

Using systems change strategies that will include creating and strengthening organizational systems to identify and document tobacco use, treating every tobacco user, and greater use of evidence-based interventions such as counseling and medication, the Center of Excellence will also promote referrals to services, such as the New York State Smokers' Quitline. In addition to providing capacity-building services and resources to local and regional partners like federally qualified health centers, CAI will support statewide efforts to increase the percentage of health care provider organizations that have formally adopted and implemented systems and policies to assist smokers in quitting.

"Our objective is to increase the number of healthcare providers and health centers making tobacco dependence treatment a systematic priority so that every tobacco user who seeks medical care is systematically offered tobacco dependence treatment," said Elizabeth Jones, Project Director for the Center of Excellence.

The newly established Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement becomes the second tobacco control initiative led by CAI and funded by the New York State Bureau of Tobacco Control with a unique focus on organization and systems-level interventions. Since 2005, CAI has served as the Tobacco Control Training Center for New York State, delivering customized trainings to contractors to help decrease youth smoking rates and mobilize communities around tobacco control policies.

According to the CDC, tobacco use remains the number one preventable cause of death and disease, afflicting nearly 600,000 New Yorkers with serious disease directly attributable to their smoking. ii To learn more about CAI's tobacco control and chronic disease prevention projects, visit our website www.caiglobal.org.

 

i Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs, 2014, Section C: Recommended Funding Levels, by State New York, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/best_practices/index.htm?s_cid=cs_3281

ii U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease: A Report of the Surgeon General., 2010, http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/2010/index.htm?s_cid=cs_1843

 

About CAI

CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well being of underserved populations worldwide. For 35 years, CAI has provided customized capacity-building services to health and human service organizations in over 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1500 training, organizational development, and capacity building programs annually, CAI's passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit www.caiglobal.org

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