NEW YORK AIMS FOR TOBACCO RATE BELOW TEN PERCENT BY 2020

Transforming Health Systems Key to Success

New York, NY – New York State is determined to reduce tobacco use below ten percent by 2020.  The State’s current rate stands at 14.5 percent. 1 To accomplish this, improvements are being made to health care delivery, assuring those New Yorkers still using tobacco at high rates are connected to the resources they need. The goal is for every health care visit to be seen as an opportunity to provide tobacco dependence treatment.

The only way that New York State will achieve its vision for 2020 is by decreasing tobacco use among those populations disproportionately impacted. Public health specialists from Buffalo to Long Island, with funding from the New York State Department of Health Bureau of Tobacco Control, are partnering with community health centers and mental health treatment facilities serving populations for which tobacco prevalence rates have not declined. Supporting these regional contractors in their work is the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York.

 “We’re working very hard to engage health systems that deliver care to the most vulnerable New Yorkers, helping them implement sustainable systems that promote tobacco dependence screening and treatment as part of every patient appointment,” said Elizabeth Jones, Director of the COE for HSI, a project of CAI.  “Transforming the health care system is the key that will get us closer to eliminating tobacco-related illness and death.”

According to the Bureau of Tobacco Control, 27.5 percent of New York adults with less than a high school education and 26.8 percent of those with an income less than $15,000 per year use tobacco. Tobacco prevalence is even higher among New York adults who report poor mental health, with one-third (33.7 percent) of this population using tobacco, a rate more than double that of the general adult population. 2

For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 36 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in over 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 regional contractors throughout New York State working with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low incomes, less than a high school diploma, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information, click here to visit the project website.

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“Leading the Way for Tobacco Control:  New York’s 2020 Vision”, Dr. Harlan Juster, New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, Contractor Webinar, August 27, 2015

2 New York State Department of Health. (2015). Bureau of Tobacco Control StatShot, Vol. 8, No. 2/Feb 2015. Retrieved from https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/tobacco_control/reports/statshots/volume8/n2_adult_smoking_prevalence_in_2013.pdf.


THE CENTER OF EXCELLENCE FOR HEALTH SYSTEMS IMPROVEMENT MARKS WORLD HEART DAY WITH APPEAL TO NEW YORK HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

New York, NY – The Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York is marking World Heart Day on September 29 with an appeal to all New York State health care providers to make the screening and treatment of tobacco dependence a primary strategy for reducing cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in New York State and the U.S. Diseases of the heart were the underlying cause of 30 percent of deaths in New York State in 2012. 1

World Heart Day is an opportune time to remind New York’s physicians, nurses, and other health care providers that tobacco use and secondhand smoke are major contributors to heart disease. Quitting tobacco use is a key step that individuals can take to improve their heart health.  

The COE for HSI encourages health care providers to ask, assist, and advise their patients about tobacco use and utilize counseling and medication—proven tools to support patients with quitting. The way to assure this takes place is through systems that standardize tobacco dependence screening and treatment into care delivery, regardless of the reason for the patient’s visit.

“There is such focus on preventing and treating cardiovascular disease, and a definite way to protect New Yorkers from diseases of the heart is by addressing tobacco use,” said Elizabeth Jones, Director of the COE for HSI, a project of CAI.  “We strongly encourage health care providers and the systems in which they work to make tobacco cessation a priority.” 

For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 36 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in over 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 regional contractors throughout New York State working with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low incomes, less than a high school diploma, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information, click here to visit the project website.

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Sharp MJ, Schoen LD, Wang T, Melnik TA. Leading causes of death, New York State, 2012. New York State Department of Health, Office of Quality and Patient Safety, Bureau of Vital Statistics. Accessed 24 September 2015 at: https://www.health.ny.gov/statistics/vital_statistics/docs/leading_causes_of_death_nys_2012.pdf

 

Tobacco Is Not An Equal Opportunity Killer

Income Level, Educational Attainment, and Mental Health Status Impact Disparities in Tobacco Use1

New York, NY – Governor Andrew Cuomo recently announced historically low tobacco use rates in New York State, with 14.5 percent of adults and 7.3 percent of high school students using tobacco.2  While these numbers are a cause for recognition, they do not tell the complete story. Tobacco continues to be the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death, killing more than 28,000 individuals in New York State every year.3 Furthermore, significant disparities in tobacco use prevalence rates persist. Those New York adults with low incomes, less than a high school education, and serious mental illness continue to use tobacco at rates well above the general population, exacerbating disparities in health-related outcomes among these populations.1

According to the New York State Bureau of Tobacco Control, 27.5 percent of New York adults with less than a high school education and 26.8 percent of those with an income less than $15,000 per year use tobacco. Tobacco use prevalence rates are even higher among New York adults who report poor mental health, with one-third (33.7 percent) of this population using tobacco, a rate more than double of that among the general adult population.1

In an effort to decrease tobacco use rates among these populations, the New York State Department of Health Bureau of Tobacco Control funds 10 regional contractors to work with health systems and mental health treatment facilities that specifically serve these populations. Through the Health Systems Improvement for a Tobacco-Free New York program, these regional contractors support health care and mental health settings to integrate evidence-based tobacco dependence screening and treatment into standard delivery of care. The Bureau of Tobacco Control also funds CAI to serve as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. In this role, CAI supports the efforts of the 10 regional contractors by providing technical assistance, develops tools and resources for use by regional contractors and their partnering health systems, and works on the State-level to promote policies that will facilitate the integration of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment into care. The ultimate goal of the Health Systems Improvement for a Tobacco-Free New York program is to assure that every tobacco user who visits a health care provider is assessed for tobacco use and offered tobacco dependence treatment, including no cost or low-cost cessation medication, at every visit.

“Health systems that serve the most vulnerable populations are critical players in reducing the unacceptably high tobacco use prevalence rates that persist among individuals with low incomes, less than a high school education, and serious mental illness,” said Elizabeth Jones, Director of the COE for HSI. “It’s a logical course of action to work with the health and mental health settings that serve these individuals to implement systems that will assure that every patient is asked about his or her tobacco use at every clinical encounter and that all tobacco users who want to quit are connected to the services and support they need to be successful. This systems-level approach has the potential to decrease disparities in tobacco use and, ultimately, disparities in health outcomes.”

For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 35 years, CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in over 23 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1,500 training programs annually, CAI's passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health System Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 Regional Contractors throughout New York State working regionally with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low income, less than a high school education, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information about the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

 


[1] New York State Department of Health. (2015). Bureau of Tobacco Control StatShot, Vol. 8, No. 2/Feb 2015. Retrieved from https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/tobacco_control/reports/statshots/volume8/n2_adult_smoking_prevalence_in_2013.pdf.

[2] New York State Governor’s Office. (2015). Governor Cuomo Announces New York's Smoking Rates Reduced to Lowest Levels in Recorded State History [Press Release]. Retrieved from https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/governor-cuomo-announces-new-yorks-smoking-rates-reduced-lowest-levels-recorded-state-history.

[3] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014). Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs—2014. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/best_practices/index.htm?s_cid=cs_3281.

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One in Five New York Men Use Tobacco

Men Disproportionately Impacted by Tobacco Use, Particularly Men with Low Incomes and/or Less than a High School Education

(New York, NY) – Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., responsible for more than 480,000 deaths annually. Disproportionately impacted by tobacco use, both in New York State and nationally, are men, who account for more than 60 percent of all tobacco-related deaths in New York State.2 Nearly one in five males use tobacco, with prevalence rates highest among individuals with low incomes and/or less than a high school education or GED.1 Men also are significantly less likely to have contact with the health care system than their female counterparts, making it critical for health systems to screen this population for tobacco use and provide tobacco dependence counseling and treatment at every encounter.3  While 70 percent of all tobacco users want to quit, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly half will make a quit attempt this year and fewer than 10 percent of tobacco users ultimately will succeed on their first quit attempt.4,5

To help address this issue, efforts are underway to ensure all New Yorkers are screened for tobacco use and have access to tobacco dependence treatment, as well as resources to help them quit. With funding from the New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, 10 regional contractors are working with health care organizations across the State to implement health systems improvements to integrate evidence-based tobacco dependence screening and treatment into standard care delivery. As the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York, CAI is supporting the efforts of the 10 regional contractors through the provision of training, technical assistance, and tool and resource development, as well as the promotion of policies to further facilitate the integration of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment into care Statewide.

“By working on the systems level, specifically within systems that serve populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years, we can assure that every patient is asked about tobacco use at every clinical encounter and offered evidence-based treatment. These efforts, in turn, will increase our chances of helping tobacco users, particularly men, take advantage of the resources available to help them quit,” said Elizabeth Jones, Director of the COE for HSI.

A December 2014 report released by the CDC confirms that receiving tobacco dependence treatment assistance from a physician more than doubles the odds that a tobacco user will quit successfully.

“In observance of Men's Health Month, June is an opportune time to focus on treating men, particularly those with low incomes, who deserve an opportunity to address this deadly addiction,” noted Elizabeth Jones. “We’ve got to make tobacco dependence treatment a priority and a standard part of the health care they receive, regardless of the reason for which they seek out care.”

Annually, more than 82 percent of adults in the U.S. have contact with a health care professional, resulting in one billion opportunities to screen for tobacco use and deliver life-saving tobacco dependence treatment.7

For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 36 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in over 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free NY. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 contractors throughout New York State working regionally with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which smoking prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low income, less than a high school diploma and/or poor mental health. Focused on providing capacity building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information, click here to visit the project website.


[1] “Bureau of Tobacco Control StatShot, Vol. 8, No. 2/Feb 2015,” New York State Department of Health, Feb. 2015. Accessed 23 June 2015 at: https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/tobacco_control/reports/statshots/volume8/n2_adult_smoking_prevalence_in_2013.pdf.
[2] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Printed with corrections, January 2014. Accessed 23 June 2015 at: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress/full-report.pdf.
[3] Kaiser Family Foundation. Putting Men’s Health Care Disparities on the Map: Examining Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities at the State Level, September 2012. Accessed 23 June 2015 at: https://kaiserfamilyfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/8344.pdf.
[4] “Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 60, No. 44: Quitting Smoking Among Adults—United States, 2001-2010,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 11 Nov. 2011. Accessed 23 June 2015 at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm6044.pdf.
[5] "Immediate Rewards of Quitting," Guide to Quitting Smoking. American Cancer Society, 1 Jan. 2011.
[6] “National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2010 Summary Tables,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2010. Accessed 23 June 2015 at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/ahcd/namcs_summary/2010_namcs_web_tables.pdf.
[7] Fiore et al. Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: 2008 Update. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 2008
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Tobacco Use and Serious Mental Illness: A Deadly Combination

Americans with serious mental illness are 70 percent more likely to be tobacco users 1

New York, NY – Tobacco accounts for 443,000 deaths in the United States annually, and 45 percent of those deaths are among individuals with serious mental illness 2. Those with serious mental illness not only have significantly higher tobacco use prevalence rates than the general population, but also consume more cigarettes per day and have lower quit rates on average 3. In observance of National Mental Health Month, May is an opportune time to recognize the disproportionate impact of tobacco use among individuals with serious mental illness - specifically the health disparities experienced by this population as a result of such disproportionate use - as well as the critical need for intervention strategies tailored to this high-risk population.

In New York State, several efforts are underway to address the issue of tobacco use among the individuals with serious mental illness. Of note, the New York State Department of Health's Bureau of Tobacco Control has funded 10 regional contractors to work with health care organizations across the State, including inpatient and outpatient mental health treatment facilities, to support the implementation of health systems improvements that will assure that every patient is screened for tobacco use and receives evidence-based tobacco dependence counseling and treatment, if desired, as part of the standard care delivery. As the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York, CAI supports regional contractors in these efforts, developing tools and resources to assist regional contractors in their work within mental health treatment facilities. The COE for HSI also works on the Statewide-level to promote a policy environment that facilitates the integration of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment into care delivery in these settings.

"With the support of evidenced-based tobacco dependence treatment and trained health care professionals, populations with serious mental illness are just as capable of quitting successfully as other tobacco users," said Elizabeth Jones, Director of the COE for HSI. "The COE for HSI and the 10 regional contractors were funded to build the capacity of health systems serving individuals with serious mental illness and the professional working within them to deliver life-saving tobacco dependence treatment to their patients."

Tobacco use is more prevalent in those with serious mental illness than in the general population, with 36 percent of the adult population using tobacco as opposed to 21 percent, respectively 4. Tobacco use rates are estimated to be 59 percent for people diagnosed with schizophrenia, 46 percent for those with bipolar disorder, and 38 percent for people with serious psychological diseases 5.

"There is an epidemic of tobacco-related disease among those suffering from serious mental illness," noted Elizabeth Jones. "Individuals with serious mental illness treated in the public health system die 25 years earlier than the general population, frequently from tobacco-related diseases, such as cancer, heart disease, and lung disease. And these individuals do not survive serious mental illness just to die from tobacco. As such, it is the responsibility of the health care systems that treat individuals with serious mental illness to address tobacco use among their patients and deliver evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment at every opportunity."

For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 35 years, CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in over 23 countries and in all 50 states. Offering over 1,500 training programs annually, CAI's passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health System Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 Regional Contractors throughout New York State working regionally with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low income, less than a high school diploma, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information about the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.


1 "CDC Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged 18=>18 Years with Mental Illness – United States, 2009-2011," Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February, 2013, http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6205a2.htm?s_cid=mm6205a2_w.

2 "Smoking Cessation," National Alliance on Mental Illness, 2015, http://www2.nami.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Hearts_and_Minds/Smoking_Cessation/Smoking_and_Mental_Illness.htm.

Glasheen C, Hedden Sl, Forman-Hoffman VL, Colpe LJ. Cigarette smoking behaviors among adults with serious mental illness in a nationally representative sample. Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Oct; 24(10):776-80.

"CDC Vital Signs: Adult Smoking Focusing on People with Mental Illness," Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February, 2013, http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/pdf/2013-02-vitalsigns.pdf.

5 McClave AK, McKnight-Eily LR, Davis SP, Dube SR. Smoking characteristics of adults with Selected Lifetime Mental Illnesses: Results from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. American Journal of Public Health, 2010; 100:12, 2464-72.

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